5 Things Clients Might Hate About Your Salon Or Spa

by Pam Stellema

in Customer Management, News, Salon Management

It’s so easy to get comfortable in your day-to-day routine.  As a matter of fact, sometimes you can get so comfortable you fail to notice the things that could be driving your clients away from your salon in droves.  No matter how long a client has been coming to you, you can never begin to take them or their comfort for granted.  As a matter of fact, a long-standing and loyal client should always receive first class service equivalent to the very first time they were in your salon.

Here  are 5 things that could be happening in your salon that could result in lost clients…

1. You keep your clients waiting for their appointment.

Nothing is more frustrating for them than having rushed to get to their appointment on time, only to wait 10 or 15 minutes to see their therapist.  If you run behind because you’re too slow delivering your treatments, then you must work towards improving your timing.  If it’s because the previous client arrived late, you must shorten her treatment routine so as not to delay the client who respectfully turned up on time.  Regardless of the reason, if your client is going to have to wait for her treatment, always show her the courtesy of an explanation right up front, so she is at least aware of what’s happening and how big a delay there will be.  This is simply being respectful.

2. Clients have to listen to the tragic tale of the therapist’s love life.

Clients may smile and ask a few personal questions, but the reality is that they are in the salon or spa to enjoy some personal down time.  If they’re going to talk about anything, it should be themselves.  Therapists must learn the art of delivering a peaceful treatment that allows the client to enjoy a relaxing and quiet time-out for themselves. This isn’t a hard one to master.  Simply answer when spoken to and then stay quiet.

3. The salon or spa is too noisy to relax.

Nothing breaks the serenity and peace of mind quite like ringing phones, screeching kids, and raucous laughter.  Adopt a low noise policy in your salon. Turn your salon phone’s ringtone down, ask clients to turn their mobiles to silent, encourage clients to leave their kids with a friend, and train your staff to speak quietly so your clients leave feeling refreshed rather than frazzled. Turn your salon in a peaceful sanctuary and you clients will love you for it.

4. Making your client feel stupid

This is easier to do than you may think.  Each time you correct or criticise a client for the choices she has made or is currently making, you are making her feel stupid.  Train your staff instead to congratulate their clients on being proactive in their beauty routine (no matter what that routine may be).  Once you have won the trust of the client, she will then be more open to hearing your suggestions on how to achieve “even better results” from her home routine.  Making a client feel stupid for her choices is a sure-fire way to lose them for good.

5. The client feels forgotten before she walks out the door

No matter how nicely you’ve treated your client during her treatment, if you ignore her the minute you’ve collected the payment, you’ve lost her.  Engage with your client until the moment she steps out the door of your salon.  Your waiting client can afford the additional 5 seconds, especially if she was greeted properly when she arrived.

These are just five simple things that won’t cost you a penny to fix in your salon or spa but could save you tens of thousands of dollars from lost clients.

Take a look around your salon by viewing it through the eyes of your clients.  Use all your senses – sight, sound, smell and touch.  What doesn’t come up to scratch?

Don’t let complacency set in and prevent you from seeing your salon just like your clients do.

Images: freedigitalphotos.net

Pam Stellema
Join me

Pam Stellema

Pam is an industry experienced coach, salon owner, speaker, author and copywriter.She works beside salon and spa owners to show them how to effectively grow their profits and remain in business for the long-term.
Pam Stellema
Join me

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